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About international cataloging in Connexion client

Find an overview on non-Latin cataloging in Connexion client.

Overview

Connexion client supports all Unicode characters for non-Latin cataloging. Unicode is the universal character encoding scheme for written characters and text. It defines a consistent way of encoding multi-script text that enables the exchange of text data internationally. MARC-8 encoding for scripts such as Arabic, Chinese, Cyrillic, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese and Korean is a subset of Unicode. The scripts defined in MARC-8 are now expanded in OCLC interfaces to include the non-MARC-8 characters that are part of these scripts.

Starting with version 2.63, Connexion client supports scripts through Unicode version 8.0.0. Information about Unicode 8.0.0 can be found here. For more information on MARC-8 characters, see the MARC-8 Code Tables.

Scripts and languages supported for bibliographic records

Connexion client supports the following non-Latin scripts for cataloging items in languages that use the scripts:

Script Examples of supported languages
Arabic Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Azerbaijani
Armenian Easter Armenian, Western Armenian
Bengali Bangla, Assamese
Chinese Chinese
Cyrillic Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Ukrainian
Devanagari Hindi, Marathi, Sanskrit, Nepali, Sherpa
Ethiopic Amharic
Greek Greek
Hebrew Hebrew
Japanese Japanese
Korean Korean
Syriac Aramaic, Syriac
Tamil Tamil
Thai Thai

 Note: You can include more than one non-Latin script anywhere in a record, including within the same field.

Scripts supported for variant name headings in authority records

Only MARC-8 character sets will be supported for adding non-Latin script variant name headings in authority records. The following scripts are supported:

  • Arabic (including the Persian language)
  • Chinese
  • Cyrillic (using MARC-8 characters only)
  • Greek
  • Hebrew (including Yiddish)
  • Japanese
  • Korean

See Add non-Latin script variant name headings in authority records for more information.

Romanized data

When cataloging in English, romanize according to the ALA-LC Romanization Tables when they exist for a particular script/language.

Character display

  • Valid Unicode characters can appear as empty boxes if they are not supported in your default font.
  • The Arial Unicode MS font that OCLC recommends will not support all scripts. You will have to search for fonts to cover some of the new scripts OCLC supports. Fonts that support these scripts vary in their ability to display characters outside of the script they were designed to support. You may have to experiment to see which font works best for your needs for a particular script. The font selected as the default in the client is applied to the entire record. You may have to move between two fonts to see all of the characters in a record.

 

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