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OCLC Support

FirstSearch and WorldCat Discovery index differences

OCLC is synchronizing the use of query syntax and index labels across all WorldShare products and interfaces. Therefore, there are some differences between FirstSearch and WorldCat Discovery.

Index changes from FirstSearch to WorldCat Discovery

For additional information, see Searching WorldCat Indexes.

Index Index to use in WorldCat Discovery
Format/document type (dt:) Use x0: and x4: (See Searching WorldCat Indexes Format/Document Type for more information)
ISBN (number search) Use bn:
Index label is optional
Hyphen is optional
ISSN (number search) Use in:
Index label is optional
Hyphen is required when using index label
Music/publisher number (number search) Use mn:
Music/publisher number (number phrase search) Use mn=
Enter all letters and numbers; concatenate all punctuation and spaces up to a dash or double hyphen.
OCLC Control Number Use no:
If you start a search with an OCLC number, use an index label for a following search term (unless you enter another OCLC number). See Searching WorldCat Indexes, OCLC Control Number for more information.
Publisher number (number search) Use mn:
Renamed to Music/publisher number
See above.
Publisher number (number phrase search) Use mn=
Renamed to Music/publisher number
See above.
Year To search date ranges, navigate to the "Advanced Search" screen and use the limiters to limit by year. The end year must be four digits.
These types of searches are not supported:
201?
2012-
2001-05

Unsupported query syntax

  • OCLC number searches must include an index label; The use of the pound sign (#) is no longer supported.
  • Index browsing is not available.
  • Whole phrase search index labels are not available.
  • Plurals (e.g. "giraffe+") are not available. They are replaced by stemming.
  • Proximity operators ("with," "w," "near," and "n") are not available. Proximity is also called adjacency. Note that the words "with" and "near" can be searched if surrounded by quotations or in an unbounded phrase search.

 

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